Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Engineer hacks a Kindle, creates easy to use prototype for sister with cerebral palsy

Engineer hacks a Kindle, creates easy to use prototype for sister with cerebral palsy:

This may not be Amazon's next version of the Kindle, but this rad mod does fill a very unique purpose. Glenn, an electrical engineer, created what he's calling the Frankenkindle for his sister, who has cerebral palsy. This e-reader features controls that are much easier for her to use than the stock buttons on the factory offering. Using the keypad from a children's reader and Amazon's pride and joy, the fully functional device is only lacking a permanent mount for the hacked digital library and some wire organization. In between the buttons and the Kindle, he's customized a Teensy USB microcontroller to interpret and pass along the proper input commands. While fully aware the device will need some user testing, Glenn intends to tailor this bad boy to his sister's specific needs -- and if that wasn't enough he's got more tricks up his sleeve that will help others with physical disabilities. If you're wanting a quick walk through, check out the video after the break.

Continue reading Engineer hacks a Kindle, creates easy to use prototype for sister with cerebral palsy

Engineer hacks a Kindle, creates easy to use prototype for sister with cerebral palsy originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 24 Aug 2011 07:58:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Monday, August 22, 2011

Tacit sonar gauntlet gives the blind ultrasonic eyes (video)

Tacit sonar gauntlet gives the blind ultrasonic eyes (video):

Sure, your Arduino project can make a stuffed monkey dance, but is it really doing anything for the greater benefit of mankind? Okay, maybe -- but not to the same degree as Grathio Labs' Tacit glove, an Arduino powered sonar device that can help the vision impaired navigate foreign environments. This wrist-mounted gauntlet is comprised of an Arduino microcontroller, a few ultrasonic sensors, and a pair of servomotors to apply variable pressure to the user's wrist to indicate their distance from an object or obstacle. Best of all, the gizmo's circuit and software are registered under Creative Commons, which means you're free to snag the plans from the source link below, and build your own. Go on, build one. Sure, it's a lot of work, but would you rather rock a wrist-mounted sonar gun, or don an ear-tugging bicycle helmet? Your choice.

Tacit sonar gauntlet gives the blind ultrasonic eyes (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 22 Aug 2011 07:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Technabob  |  sourceGrathio Labs  | Email this | Comments

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Bionic leg anticipates wearer's movements for more natural motion

Bionic leg anticipates wearer's movements for more natural motion:

Vanderbilt University researchers have debuted a new prosthetic leg that promises a more natural walking experience. Built-in sensors monitor the wearer's movement, data which is sent to a microprocessor, in order anticipate motion. The knee and ankle joints, meanwhile, work in unison, considerably cutting down on the sort of lag this is customary with more traditional prosthetic devices, a fact confirmed by tester Craig Hutto. The bionic limb, which took some seven years to develop, can increase the walking speed of its wearer by up to 25 percent, thanks to its need for considerably less energy from the user than passive prosthetic limbs. Check out a video of the leg in action at the source link below.

Bionic leg anticipates wearer's movements for more natural motion originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 18 Aug 2011 12:27:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink PhysOrg  |  sourceVanderbilt  | Email this | Comments

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Accessibility For Lion

Accessibility For Lion: "
OS X Lion

OS X LionToday Mac OS X 10.7, named Lion, became available to users. You can download Lion for just US$29 and Lion will run on most Intel-based Mac computers.

To check whether your computer will run Lion click on the Apple shaped icon at the top left of your screen, then choosing “About This Mac” from the menu. The information you need is in the line labelled “Processors”, and your Mac must have an Intel Core 2 Duo, Core i3, Core i5, Core i7, or Xeon processor to run Lion.

Remember to check the compatibility of ALL essential hardware and software before you decide to upgrade to Lion. Some programs and devices may not be compatible yet.

Lion is the first version of OS X which can be downloaded by users from the Mac App Store, which should save you a trip to the store or a shipping charge if your internet connection is good enough to cope. The download is about four gigabytes which could take several hours even on a fairly fast broadband connection. But if you can’t afford the time or money it would cost for you to download the upgrade, you can download Lion at Apple retail stores. Later this August, Lion will also be made available on a USB thumb drive through the Apple Stores.

So what’s new in Lion from an accessibility perspective? Apple’s web page listing new features in OS X Lion seems to list a lot of things which have actually been available to Snow Leopard users for a while now, but I’ll try to let you know which is which.

Note: I haven’t upgraded to Lion yet so I’m going by what’s on Apple’s web pages and documentation writing this article. I’d appreciate comments and feedback, especially if I’ve got things wrong!

OS X More Like iOS

This isn’t specifically listed on Apple’s page but it’s been observed my many people: OS X Lion on your Mac now behaves more like iOS does on the iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch. The two are far from identical but OS X now has more features that iOS has including: more multi-touch gestures, full screen apps, the app store, and ‘suspend’ for apps.

I think having the two systems becoming more similar is an overall win for accessibility because many of us use a Mac and an iPhone or iPad and the more similar they are the easier it is to learn and remember how to use them.

More Multi-Touch Gestures

Some multi-touch gestures, such as 2-finger scrolling, have been available for a while to Snow Leopard users with a laptop, Magic Trackpad or Magic Mouse. New gestures mimicing iOS gestures include tap-to-zoom (as in iOS’s Safari) and swipe-to-navigate (like how you turn pages in iBooks). OS X also has some new gestures not found in iOS including ways to switch between apps using just gestures.

The support page OS X Lion: About Multi-Touch Gestures lists the gestures with descriptions and pictures, or if you’ve already upgraded to Lion you can open the Trackpad and Mouse panes of System Preferences to see videos of each gesture.

Multi-touch gestures can be great for some people with limited movement but awful for others, depending on each person’s specific limitations. At the moment it looks like all of these functions can be triggered via the keyboard as well as via multi-touch so they can be also be customised to be triggered via on-screen keyboard, switch, etc. – that’s something that I’m sure accessibility teams will keep an eye on in the future!

Mac App Store

I believe that the Mac App store is definitely a win for accessibility – it makes it easy to search for access-related programs and takes the fiddlyness out of buying them. Not all Mac programs can be found via the Mac App store though which makes it significantly less useful than the iTunes App Store for iOS, but this should change over time

Versions and Auto Save

Auto Save is just what it sounds like – there’s no need to remember to “press save”, the Mac will do it for you. And Versions, a bit like Time Machine, will automatically save old versions of your documents and help you compare the old and new versions.

These will be an especial help to those with memory or attention problems, as well as saving all of us when our memory or attention spans fail.

VoiceOver and Braille Languages

OS X now comes with voices in many languages for VoiceOver users and braille tables for a wide variety of languages too. Previously OS X only shipped with text-to-speech voices in English and other languages had to be purchased at additional cost – it’s great to see this accessibility more widely available.

High Resolution Cursor

Previous OS X users who increased the cursor magnification, such as myself, will have been frustrated at how pixelated and “blocky” the cursor looked when its size was enlarged. Lion’s cursor finally fixes this problem!

Picture-In-Picture Zoom

Getting “lost” at high levels of zoom has always been a problem – it’s not always easy to keep track of which bit of the zoomed screen you’re viewing. The screen zoom feature in Lion offers a picture-in-picture view, allowing you to see the zoomed area in a separate window while keeping the rest of the screen at its native size. Choose to have the window follow the cursor, or keep the window in one place to show only areas you navigate.

Improved Auto-Correction

Another area where OS X and iOS are converging, auto-correction in Lion displays suggested spellings below the word. Press Return to accept the change or click the X to keep the current spelling.

There are lots more new features – you can check out Apple’s What’s New In OS X Lion page yourself.

A smoother cursor is a small thing but I think it’s the accessibility feature I’m looking forward to the most – that blocky cursor really has driven me crazy! The Picture-In-Picture zoom also has exciting potential because it’s something I could use a lot. What are you most looking forward to in OS X Lion?

- Ricky Buchanan

Some of the links in this article are affiliate links. This means that if you purchase the products that I've linked to I'll get a commission - a small percentage of the sale price. It won't cost you anything and it will help to support me and ATMac.

Related posts:

  1. Back To The Accessible Mac: Accessibility Implications From Apple’s 20 October Event’

  2. WWDC '10 Announcements: Accessibility Implications

  3. Leopard Accessibility Presentation Resources

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This article was originally published at Accessibility For Lion and is copyright (C) Ricky Buchanan 2010. May be forwarded but do not republish without permission.


New Case Could Make It Easier For Visually Impaired To Use iPad

New Case Could Make It Easier For Visually Impaired To Use iPad: "

New Case Could Make It Easier For Visually Impaired To Use iPad

For the blind and those who are visually impaired, Jayson D’Alessandro has created the Omnifer iPad cover. Still only a concept, the case transforms the iPad’s flat surface into Braille, reflecting the contents of the page you are surfing.

According to a posting at Yanko Design, the Omnifer uses gas pockets filled with a chemical that reacts by expanding when exposed to light. This allows braille dots to rise, as necessary.

Omnifer Case For iPad

Omnifer Case For iPad

Naturally, in order for this to be successful, apps must be developed that interact with the case. In doing so, the app would automatically stream text into braille format to the user’s fingertips. As of now, the supporting technology is not yet available.

This is a brilliant concept. It would be terrific to see it implemented sometime in the future.

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